Fracking near Mesa Verde and White River

Colorado is home to some of the most beautiful national parks and forests in the country. But several of these treasured places—from White River National Forest to Mesa Verde National Park—are now threatened by the oil and gas industry's plan to expand fracking.

A threat to Colorado's environment

With well pads, compressors, pipelines and hundreds of truck trips, fracking in our national forests would mean turning some our most special places into industrial zones.

And fracking uses millions of gallons of fresh water, and leaves them polluted with toxic chemicals. This toxic wastewater can leak and contaminate our rivers and streams, and should be kept far away from our national forests and parks.

We're calling on our federal officials

Fracking turns pristine acres into industrial zones, pollutes the air, and puts waterways at risk of contamination. Our parks and forests should be protected, not opened to this dangerous drilling process. That's why Environment Colorado is working to protect all our special places by calling on our decision-makers to act.

Will elected officials protect our special places from fracking?

With the fracking boom, the oil and gas industry is aiming to bring its dirty drilling to more of our treasured places across our state. But if enough of us speak out, we can make sure our parks and forests are protected from fracking. Environment Colorado is calling on our federal officials to:

  • Keep fracking out of our national forests and away from our national parks and drinking water sources; and
  • Close the loopholes exempting fracking from key environmental laws—especially the one exempting billions of gallons of toxic fracking waste from our nation's hazardous waste law.

Together, we can win

Our federal officials have the opportunity to step up and keep places like White River National Forest and Mesa Verde protected from this dirty drilling in or around them—but the oil and gas industry is working to block their action.

With your support, we can get our elected officials to do the right thing for Colorado's parks and forests.

Protect White River National Forest, Mesa Verde and more.

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